‘Seeing slavery in seafood supply chains’, by Katrina Nakamura et. al., Science Advances

Article description:

The authors of this paper won the grand prize in the Partnership for Freedom challenge 2016 for their work developing technological solutions that can identify and address slavery and trafficking in goods and service supply chains. They designed a five-point-framework, called the Labor Safe Screen, and collaborated with eighteen food companies to test the results of implementing the framework. The results showed that companies can reduce forced labor using the framework. 

Read the article here: http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/4/7/e1701833

A Human Rights Approach – Briefing sheet

Reports and convictions of trafficking in Australia have occurred. They have occurred in situations of slavery, sexual servitude, forced labour, forced marriage, domestic servitude ( in home workers) and debt bondage. Exact numbers of people trafficked to Australia each year is not known due to difficulty in reporting and because of the illegal nature of the crime. There is also a need for a national compensation scheme for people who have been caught in slavery in Australia. All the compensation schemes are state based and different. Yet slavery is a national crime. To address these issues adequately, Australia will need a Domestic Slavery Commission. The Commissioner would be a focus and a central “go to” point to ensure the implementation of an Act and adequate care for people caught in slavery in Australia.

Laws reflect the values of a culture. Freedom is a human right and not a privilege. Human rights protection has traditionally been a matter for the State. However, due to globalisation, the liberalisation of trade and the immense economic power of corporations, it is now well recognised that there is also a crucial link between the way in which businesses conduct their operations, human rights and diligent corporate social responsibility policies. In addressing human trafficking, slavery and slave like practices in Australia, our laws should take into account that the most immediate obligation is to ensure that the victim is protected from further exploitation and harm and that compensation and remediation is available. These are basic human rights that Australia has committed to. These should underpin a Modern Slavery Act.

Human Rights Approach REVISED Human Rights Approach

Download this briefing paper to be better informed. Sheets can also be printed and shared with your politicians.

Australia has obligations under a number of international treaties to protect survivors of human tra cking and slavery.5 It is essential that the rights and safety of survivors are at the heart of any legislation or policy to combat human trafficking and slavery.

Human rights protection has traditionally been a matter for the State. However, due to globalisation, the liberalisation of trade and the immense economic power of corporations, it is now well recognised that there is a crucial link between the way in which businesses conduct their operations and human rights. Businesses have a responsibility to protect human rights impacts that are linked directly to their operations. Around the world more and more responsible businesses are investing in corporate social responsibility prolicies that put human rights front and centre of business practice. In the list of the world’s top 100 economic entities, 31 are nation states and 69 are corporations.

Ethical Fashion Report – Baptist World Aid Australia

Each year Baptist World Aid Australia Advocacy area produced this report. They are very active members and partners to STOP THE TRAFFIK Australian Coalition. As they say about the report:

It… sheds light on what the industry and individual companies are doing to address forced labour, child labour and exploitation. Each report – since the launch of the first in 2013 – has tracked the progress within the industry. The change since 2013 has been significant. In this edition we have assessed 106 companies, awarding each a grade from A to F based on the strength of their labour rights management systems to mitigate the risk of exploitation in their supply chain. This report marks a significant expansion of the work of previous reports adding 50% more companies, updating the research and adopting a new and enhanced rating tool. 78% of the companies assessed directly engaged in the research process – up from 54% in the first report.

You can read the full report at: https://baptistworldaid.org.au/resources/2017-ethical-fashion-report/

 

What is the Ethical Fashion Guide?

Each year Baptist World Aid Advocacy research and develop the Ethical Fashion Guide. It has become an industry standard. As they say: The Ethical Fashion Guide is a companion to the 2017 Ethical Fashion Report. Use it to help you make everyday, ethical purchasing decisions. Take it with you when you shop and buy your clothes from the companies doing more to protect their workers. Vote with your wallet and encourage more companies to end exploitation in their supply chains. It can be downloaded at: https://baptistworldaid.org.au/resources/2017-ethical-fashion-guide/