Commonwealth of Australia, House of Representatives, Hansard, Wednesday, 17 September 2018

Description:

The Modern Slavery Bill is currently being considered by Parliament. On 17 September 2018 there was a second reading during which a number of members gave speeches and put forward amendments and opinions. Mr Thistlethwaite, stated that as it stands, without amendments, ‘the Modern Slavery Bill 2018 doesn’t go far enough, and unfortunately, ignores the recommendations of several inquiries’. With regard to the issue he goes on to state that Australian businesses can, ‘play a major role in either facilitating modern day slavery or helping to eradicate it. Companies can be culpable by driving down supplier price or demanding ever-quicker production’. Mr Bandt, also identified that this issue is not just occurring in global supply chains but also in our backyards, with a story of clients he represented while he worked as a lawyer. Ms Plibersek said, ‘As a society, we won’t be able to end it unless we have laws dedicated to preventing it and to stopping it and resources to support that legislation’.

Read the hearing here: https://mail-attachment.googleusercontent.com/

Commonwealth of Australia, House of Representatives, Hansard, Wednesday, 12 September 2018

Hearing description:

The Modern Slavery Bill is currently being considered by Parliament. On 12 September 2018 there was a second reading during which a number of members gave speeches and put forward amendments including the inclusion of penalties for non-compliance and the establishment of an independent commissioner. Ms O’Neil of Hotham stated, ‘tackling slavery and exploitation is absolutely core to Labor’s mission’ and that, ’Modern slavery is everywhere we look. The problem that we face is that we are not looking enough and that brings us to the bill before us’. She also stated, with regard to the importance of penalties for non-compliance, that, ‘For a long time, companies have argued that what their suppliers do is none of of their business, and we just believe that is not good enough anymore….I just want to make it absolutely crystal clear that complying with Australian law is not optional; it’s not optional for the ordinary citizen, it’s not optional for people that sit in this chamber and it should not be optional for big business’. There is indeed overwhelming support for the Modern Slavery Bill, Mr Crewther, who led the Modern Slavery inquiry, when speaking said, ‘this is indeed an issue that has brought together both the left and right not only in politics but in the broader community’.

Read the hearing here: https://mail-attachment.googleusercontent.com/

‘Tackling modern slavery in global supply chains’, by Kevin Hyland OBE, The British Academy

Blog description:

This blog post is written by the UK’s first Independent Anti-Slavery Commissioner, Kevin Hyland OBE. This is an incredibly powerful, informative and inspirational read. The closing sentence states, We have incumbent upon us a moral duty to stop privileging price and profit over the basic wellbeing and rights of people who are just like you and me, but happen to have been born into different circumstances.’ Kevin Hyland focuses in particular on the role of the private sector in this blog post. He states, too often in my role as Commissioner, I have been told that solving forced labour in the private sector is ‘impossible’, particularly with regard to the Global South. It is not; rather, this is wilful blindness to the solutions needed’.

Read blog here: https://www.thebritishacademy.ac.uk/blog/tackling-modern-slavery-global-supply-chains

‘The UK Modern Slavery Act and EU Timber Regulation: Synergies and Divergence’, by Duncan Black and Jade Sanders, Forest Trends

Report description:

This report analyses the similarities and differences between the UK Modern Slavery Act (MSA) and the EU Timber Regulation (EUTR) with regard to learning from ‘EUTR experiences to inform implementation of the more recently enacted MSA’. The EUTR is concerned with prohibiting illegally sourced timber products in the EU and requiring those that source timber products to exercise due diligence in sourcing. Both the EUTR and the MSA are focused on improving buying behaviour standards with regard to reducing undesirable practices, specifically modern slavery and illegal logging.

Read the report here: https://www.forest-trends.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/doc_5709.pdf