Commonwealth of Australia, House of Representatives, Hansard, Wednesday, 17 September 2018

Description:

The Modern Slavery Bill is currently being considered by Parliament. On 17 September 2018 there was a second reading during which a number of members gave speeches and put forward amendments and opinions. Mr Thistlethwaite, stated that as it stands, without amendments, ‘the Modern Slavery Bill 2018 doesn’t go far enough, and unfortunately, ignores the recommendations of several inquiries’. With regard to the issue he goes on to state that Australian businesses can, ‘play a major role in either facilitating modern day slavery or helping to eradicate it. Companies can be culpable by driving down supplier price or demanding ever-quicker production’. Mr Bandt, also identified that this issue is not just occurring in global supply chains but also in our backyards, with a story of clients he represented while he worked as a lawyer. Ms Plibersek said, ‘As a society, we won’t be able to end it unless we have laws dedicated to preventing it and to stopping it and resources to support that legislation’.

Read the hearing here: https://mail-attachment.googleusercontent.com/

Commonwealth of Australia, House of Representatives, Hansard, Wednesday, 12 September 2018

Hearing description:

The Modern Slavery Bill is currently being considered by Parliament. On 12 September 2018 there was a second reading during which a number of members gave speeches and put forward amendments including the inclusion of penalties for non-compliance and the establishment of an independent commissioner. Ms O’Neil of Hotham stated, ‘tackling slavery and exploitation is absolutely core to Labor’s mission’ and that, ’Modern slavery is everywhere we look. The problem that we face is that we are not looking enough and that brings us to the bill before us’. She also stated, with regard to the importance of penalties for non-compliance, that, ‘For a long time, companies have argued that what their suppliers do is none of of their business, and we just believe that is not good enough anymore….I just want to make it absolutely crystal clear that complying with Australian law is not optional; it’s not optional for the ordinary citizen, it’s not optional for people that sit in this chamber and it should not be optional for big business’. There is indeed overwhelming support for the Modern Slavery Bill, Mr Crewther, who led the Modern Slavery inquiry, when speaking said, ‘this is indeed an issue that has brought together both the left and right not only in politics but in the broader community’.

Read the hearing here: https://mail-attachment.googleusercontent.com/

‘Driving Behaviour Change of Recruiters, Suppliers, and Job Seekers Toward Ethical Recruitment, Critical Roles of Global Buyers & Grassroots Actors’, by Rende Taylor, Lisa Maria and Ohnmar Ei Ei Chaw, Issara Institute, 2018

Report description:

This report details the work and findings of the work of the Issara Institute in Myanmar and Thailand on driving more ethical recruitment systems and empowering jobseekers with ‘facts, knowledge, and choices’ so that they can more successfully navigate their work journeys.  The report details the positive role and high level of trust jobseekers have of Civil Society Organisations and the effectiveness of technology, specifically phone based, in empowering jobseekers. The report also highlights the recruitment fees most jobseekers personally incur and the urgency in making ‘zero fee’ recruitment for jobseekers the norm, as well as the issues with Myanmar and Thai government policies in improving ethical recruitment and jobseeker empowerment.

Read the report here: http://media.wix.com/ugd/5bf36e_4620b33fdea7485382683dd927a97378.pdf

‘2018 information and communications technology benchmark findings report’, Know the Chain

Report description:

In this report KnowTheChain looked at this question,’are the largest information and communications technology companies in the world doing enough to eradicate forced labor from their supply chains?’ Each company received an overall benchmark score, ranging from zero to 100 which was determined with regard to weighing seven themes equally: commitment and governance, traceability and risk assessment, purchasing practises, recruitment, worker voice, monitoring and remedy. In this study KnowTheChain evaluated 40 companies and the average benchmark score was 32 out of 100. Further, the two areas that were thought in this report to have the most impact on workers’ lives, worker voice and recruitment, were the lowest scoring themes.

Read the report here: https://knowthechain.org/wp-content/plugins/ktc-benchmark/app/public/images/benchmark_reports/KTC-ICT-May2018-Final.pdf

‘Business Starts To Take Human Rights Seriously As Laws And Benchmarks Start To Bite’, by Mike Scott, Forbes

Article description:

This article centres around a report from the Corporate Human Rights Benchmark (CHRB) , a non-profit company, that have ranked corporate performance on human rights. Steve Waygood, chair of the CHRB Board and chief responsible investment officer at Aviva Investors, says that issues such as modern slavery are correlated with financial performance and that companies that don’t engage in solving this issue ‘may risk restricted access to capital due to repetitional damage and regulatory backlash’.

Overall, however the report notes increased human rights reporting and commitment to transparency by companies and a “race to the top” culture on the issue of human rights.

Read the article here: https://www.forbes.com/sites/mikescott/2018/05/21/business-starts-to-take-human-rights-seriously-as-laws-and-benchmarks-start-to-bite/#8ce84907f5db

‘Ripe for Change’, by Robin Willoughby and Tim Gore, Oxfam

Paper description:

This paper examines the human rights issues in supermarket supply chains, shining a light on how worker and small-scale farmer inequality and suffering correlates with the power and financial reward of big business. The paper also highlights the correlation between supermarket’s power and governments pursuing ‘an agenda of trade liberalisation and deregulation of agricultural and labour markets’ before going on to identify actions that can be pursued to tackle human rights abuses in supermarket supply chains.

Winnie Byanyima, Executive Director of Oxfam International says in her foreword, ‘We all enjoy good food. Cooking our favourite ingredients or sharing a meal are among our simplest pleasures. But too often the food we savour comes at an unacceptable price: the suffering of the people who produced it.’

Read the paper here: https://oxfamilibrary.openrepository.com/bitstream/handle/10546/620418/cr-ripe-for-change-supermarket-supply-chains-210618-summ-en.pdf?sequence=5

‘The UK Modern Slavery Act and EU Timber Regulation: Synergies and Divergence’, by Duncan Black and Jade Sanders, Forest Trends

Report description:

This report analyses the similarities and differences between the UK Modern Slavery Act (MSA) and the EU Timber Regulation (EUTR) with regard to learning from ‘EUTR experiences to inform implementation of the more recently enacted MSA’. The EUTR is concerned with prohibiting illegally sourced timber products in the EU and requiring those that source timber products to exercise due diligence in sourcing. Both the EUTR and the MSA are focused on improving buying behaviour standards with regard to reducing undesirable practices, specifically modern slavery and illegal logging.

Read the report here: https://www.forest-trends.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/doc_5709.pdf

‘Towards the urgent elimination of hazardous child labour’, International Labour Organisation

Report description:

This report from the International Labour Organisation (ILO) builds upon a previous report from the ILO published in 2011 called ‘Children in hazardous work: What we know, what we need to do (ILO-IPEC, 2011)’. This new report is said to  be based on new evidence ‘aiding better understanding of why this worst form of child labour persists and uncovering new interventions that might have more chance of eliminating it’. It was estimated by the ILO in 2017 that there were 152 million children in child labour and that almost 73 million of these were engaged in hazardous work.

Read the report here: https://www.ilo.org/ipec/Informationresources/WCMS_IPEC_PUB_30315/lang–en/index.htm?mc_cid=01c926b680&mc_eid=4743844cbe

‘Seeing slavery in seafood supply chains’, by Katrina Nakamura et. al., Science Advances

Article description:

The authors of this paper won the grand prize in the Partnership for Freedom challenge 2016 for their work developing technological solutions that can identify and address slavery and trafficking in goods and service supply chains. They designed a five-point-framework, called the Labor Safe Screen, and collaborated with eighteen food companies to test the results of implementing the framework. The results showed that companies can reduce forced labor using the framework. 

Read the article here: http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/4/7/e1701833