‘Ripe for Change’, by Robin Willoughby and Tim Gore, Oxfam

Paper description:

This paper examines the human rights issues in supermarket supply chains, shining a light on how worker and small-scale farmer inequality and suffering correlates with the power and financial reward of big business. The paper also highlights the correlation between supermarket’s power and governments pursuing ‘an agenda of trade liberalisation and deregulation of agricultural and labour markets’ before going on to identify actions that can be pursued to tackle human rights abuses in supermarket supply chains.

Winnie Byanyima, Executive Director of Oxfam International says in her foreword, ‘We all enjoy good food. Cooking our favourite ingredients or sharing a meal are among our simplest pleasures. But too often the food we savour comes at an unacceptable price: the suffering of the people who produced it.’

Read the paper here: https://oxfamilibrary.openrepository.com/bitstream/handle/10546/620418/cr-ripe-for-change-supermarket-supply-chains-210618-summ-en.pdf?sequence=5

‘Towards the urgent elimination of hazardous child labour’, International Labour Organisation

Report description:

This report from the International Labour Organisation (ILO) builds upon a previous report from the ILO published in 2011 called ‘Children in hazardous work: What we know, what we need to do (ILO-IPEC, 2011)’. This new report is said to  be based on new evidence ‘aiding better understanding of why this worst form of child labour persists and uncovering new interventions that might have more chance of eliminating it’. It was estimated by the ILO in 2017 that there were 152 million children in child labour and that almost 73 million of these were engaged in hazardous work.

Read the report here: https://www.ilo.org/ipec/Informationresources/WCMS_IPEC_PUB_30315/lang–en/index.htm?mc_cid=01c926b680&mc_eid=4743844cbe

Advancing Traceability in the Seafood Industry White Paper – Fishwise

Fishwise released their first White Paper in 2012. This is an updated one and gives key insights into the possibilities and challenges to traceability in the industry. As they state:

It is hoped that this document will create connections across businesses, organizations, and governments to spark conversation and action as to how the seafood stakeholders can collaborate to help improve seafood traceability and eliminate human rights abuses and illegal products from supply chains.

It contains a very good diagram on the Seafood Supply Chain:

FishWise (2017) Advancing Traceability in the Seafood Industry: Assessing Challenges and Opportunities.

It can be read or downloaded at:

www.fishwise.org/images/white_papers/Advancing_Traceability_in_the_Seafood_Industry.pdf

Thai Union Sustainability Report 2016

Thai Union realised they had slavery in their chain of supply – mainly, but not exclusively in the fishing boats. They have been working at changing the culture and the supply chain traceability and transparency. This 2016 Sustainability Report tells what they have been aiming to do and how. Key areas in their Safe and Legal Labour section include:

  • Thai Union Business Ethics And Labour Code Of Conduct

    Human Rights And Ethical Labour Practices

    Supplier Approval Process

    Migrant Worker Recruitment Policy

    Opting For Zero-Recruitment Fees Policy

    Continues Its Transition To Digital Payments Worldwide

    The full report can be read or downloaded